Editorial 02/17

by Klemens Rethmann

Dear readers,

We are currently going through the process of change associated with Industry 4.0 – but the next catch-phrase is already following close behind: Mobility 4.0. What does it mean?

Industry 4.0 represents automation – this means, standardising processes and categorising data. Mobility 4.0 entails significantly greater flexibility, particularly when it comes to mobility for people. That is to say, if services operate according to a set timetable at the moment, they will be organised in line with demand in future.

“Mobility 4.0 is only feasible if it is possible to process data efficiently and dynamically through a permanent communications system.”
 

Efficient IT services and the networking of people through digital communications are necessary to ensure that this works smoothly. Car sharing, for example, only makes sense if it is organised digitally. After all, users need to know where the next free car is located or the free car must be able to navigate its way to the next user.

In this sense, the two buzz-words Industry 4.0 and Mobility 4.0 are highly compatible – because both of them are only feasible if it is possible to process data efficiently and dynamically through a permanent communications system.

Logistics specialists like us already organise the mobility of goods in a very flexible manner by optimising networks dynamically, planning routes individually on a daily basis and adapting matters during the course of the day, if the need arises. We have developed our own IT tools to cope with these challenges.

However, not every development that people are currently applauding within the context of Mobility 4.0 is actually an innovation. Let us take platooning, for example, where a series of trucks follow each other closely to form a column, or trucks with overhead catenary establish a link to the electricity grid. Both these systems have functioned well on the railway networks for decades.

So far it has not been possible to significantly increase the market share of goods shipped by rail. Why? There has simply not been a consistent and workable investment strategy as regards the network infrastructure. Bottlenecks like those in the Upper Rhine area or on the Betuwe line could have been prevented many years ago.

We can only hope that politicians, corporations and society in general will set the right course both at a domestic and international level in future. Do you not get annoyed by gaps in mobile phone reception, the closure of bridges or the state of the tracks when you are travelling by car or train?

The ongoing technological development of our society depends on how the worlds of politics and business manage to do their homework. We at Rhenus are more than happy to face the challenges of Mobility 4.0 – for the benefit of our customers.

However, it is not enough to view progress simply in terms of digitalisation and automation. Our customers decide how they wish to communicate with us. We need to adapt in a flexible manner. That is to say, Mobility 4.0 needs to be organised in such a way that many benefit from it and remain mobile at all times.

null

 

null

Klemens Rethmann
CEO

Index
Remaining articles of the same issue
Rhenus in brief 02/17

Rhenus Short News

“Provide evidence of your creativity and entrepreneurship” – that was the invitation issued to all Rhenus employees during the spring to take part in the Rhevo innovation project. 260 workers from 28 different countries did not need to be told twice and developed ingenious ideas and solutions in order to enable the Rhenus world to move forward with the help of digital technologies. The best projects presented to a jury in July are now set to be implemented. The project was also introduced at the first digital summit organised by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.
Lead story 02/17

individual, fast, autonomous

Tokyo at 7 a.m. in the year 2030: Ken Yamada takes the back seat in the driverless taxi that he has just ordered and answers his emails. The electric vehicle suddenly glides into the right lane, because it knows that there is a traffic jam at the next crossing. Yamada changes to a driverless underground train at a railway station and completes the last few metres to his office on a rented e-bike. Once he has arrived, he has already completed many tasks.
Interview 02/17

Rhenus builds an electric Transporter with individual Cargo Bodies

Rhenus SML N.V., a subsidiary of Rhenus Automotive Systems, is handling the complete production of a new electric trans- porter that is especially suitable for last mile deliveries – i.e. transport operations right to a company's or consumer’s premises; this work is taking place in Belgium. Rhenus SML’s Managing Director Stefan Maussen talks about the innovative project and the challenges facing the automotive sector.
Trends & Markets 02/17

Rhenus creates new connections between global markets

TWO NEW GATEWAYS FOR THE RHENUS AIR & OCEAN NETWORK The Rhenus air and sea freight units have enjoyed considerable growth during the last few years. It is therefore not surprising to hear that the logistics specialist opened two new gateways in Germany for groupage freight at the same time in 2017. The sea freight gateway is located at the Hilden business site near Düsseldorf, while the air freight hub is based at “Cargo-City-Süd” at the international airport in Frankfurt. Goods for import and export are consolidated at both the gateways and new freight services are being developed and expanded.
Report 02/17

From Wilhelmshaven to the North Cape

Rhenus Midgard in Wilhelmshaven has everything that a bridge needs: adequate space (15,000 square metres), a motorway link for deliveries and a heavy-duty quay that is not adversely affected by 700 tonnes! This means ideal conditions for the final assembly and shipment of a network arch bridge that is set to span the Bøkfjorden fjord in Norway in future.
Sector 02/17

Mobile Post

While a set place of work or at least a postbox were the rule in a company in the old days, things have changed radically in recent years. “You can hardly find a banker with a pigeon hole nowadays,” says Axel Rautschka, Managing Director of Rhenus Mailroom Services. “Instead, there are mobile workstations everywhere. Employees work where there is a free space.” This is compounded by the fact that employees are more often on the road and sometimes work from home too.
The Rhenus World 02/17

The Chemistry Is Just Right

Biesterfeld Spezialchemie has a reputation for being one of the leading international distributors of products and solutions in the world of specialty chemicals. These substances are needed for paints and printing inks – but also for adhesives and electronics or even in the fields of foodstuffs, health care and personal care. As the previous warehouse in Hilden had become too small, the company decided in December 2016 to move into business premises in neighbouring Solingen. However, it set very high standards: the company was aiming to do more than just move into a new warehouse. Logistics needs intelligent management to ensure that goods reach the right place at the right time anywhere in the world.
City 02/17

A CITY LINKING THE PAST AND THE FUTURE

What do Amsterdam, Madrid, Copenhagen, Brussels, Prague, Dublin and Vilnius all have in common? They were all the European Capital of Culture at some stage. When Vilnius was allowed to share the title with Linz in 2009, the Baroque city with its impressive architecture was still unknown to many Europeans.
Index
More articles of the same category
Editorial 01/20

by Klemens Rethmann

This is not the first time and it will certainly not be the last time that I write about our major focus on our customers here. It is simply impossible to talk too much about a company’s orientation towards its customers. After all, they are the key element in the success of our daily work and therefore for Rhenus as a whole.
Editorial 02/19

The editorial in video form

The world seems to be turning faster every day. Everything is changing and becoming new. We are more than happy to try out new things in our corporate magazine too. You can find the editorial by CEO Klemens Rethmann as a video online for the first time at: www.bit.ly/KRethEdEN
Editorial 01/19

by Klemens Rethmann

If you want to be successful, act with a sense of entre- preneurship and assume some responsibility.
Editorial 02/18

by Dr. Stephan Peters

Creating value added for customers means discovering what they need before they recognise it themselves. We therefore provide value added through our communications too by distributing information beyond the normal channels. This includes social networks. Our QR codes give you some idea of this.
Editorial 01/18

by Klemens Rethmann

Each company, whether it has existed for a long time or is a start-up, needs to tackle the following fundamental questions at least once: “What distinguishes us, who are we and what do we represent?”
Editorial 01/17

by Klemens Rethmann

The workers at Rhenus are as varied as our corporate group and the people, customers and sectors that we look after.
Issues
More Logistics People